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Fair skin, dark skin and love across our Black communities (straight talk!) - SEYTOO.COM
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Fair skin, dark skin and love across our Black communities (straight talk!)

Life & Society

What black women should know is that the original is always better than the copy, so it would be better to be a real black rather than a fake white. You black women will gain by accepting yourself as you are

Updated on October 21, 2020, L’epicée
Fair skin, dark skin and love across our Black communities (straight talk!)

Within the black community, the poisonous legacy of slavery has viciously perpetuated a peculiar mentality of establishing a hierarchy between those who are fair and those who are dark. The anchoring is such that there is a whole nomenclature to be distinguished according to the degree of clarity of some and the extent of darkness of others. Romantic relationships do not escape this matrix. This is certainly the area where the color differentiation between blacks is most evident. Indeed among blacks, the success of a fair complexion is illustrated through two variations: on the one hand the preference of black men for girls with fair complexion, and on the other hand the frustration and the complex that such preference engenders in women with dark pigmentation, who go so far as to lighten their skin to remain competitive in the marriage market.

The fair-skinned woman is “popular” with these gentlemen, so that almost everywhere she is given a particular name, just to distinguish her from others. It is called “Grimelle” in Haiti, “Brune” in Cameroon, but the toponymy is found among the West Indies. Indeed in the West Indies, much more than in Africa, the clearer you are the better. Being dark-skinned is seen at best as a real flaw, and at worst as a real curse. The West Indians have a whole host of words to designate women with fair skin: “mixed race”, “Chabine”, “capped skin” (hear the skin escaped from suffering), “saved skin” (hear the skin saved from misfortune ), in short, so many expressions whose meaning undulates as the pigmentation becomes clearer or darker.

Thus among Blacks, the beautiful woman is perceived as being the one with fair skin and preferably smooth and long hair. From there, it is easy to understand why dark women, especially in Africa, flock to lightening products and give pride of place to straightening products, at the same time as they embark on the race for false hair (transplant, wig, hairpiece, weaving etc.).

Indeed, lightening of the skin is very common in Africa. It is the Zairians, sorry the Congolese (pfff it's the same!) who are the champions. There, it is as if clearing up your skin is a duty enshrined in the constitution of this lousy country. The phenomenon is experiencing a worrying boom on the rest of the continent, it is referred to by various names: “Xessal” in Senegal, “Tcha-tcho” in Mali, “Ambi” in Gabon, “Akonti” in Togo, “Dorot” in Niger or even “Make-up” in Cameroon. In all these countries, the sale of lightening products is a flourishing business because the demand is very high.

The epidermal ostracism within the black community is such that even in common parlance you often hear expressions like “She is too black,” but you will never hear from a woman that she is too light. So, if besides being “too black” you are fat and poor, know that you are ruined. During the evenings, while the fair-skinned women will be invited to have fun, you black people go to “something else” like old prostitutes leaning against their pole and pulling the face for lack of customers.

What black women should know is that the original is always better than the copy, so it would be better to be a real black rather than a fake white. Because if for a man, the criteria of beauty which govern his choices are the length of the hair and the clarity of the skin, the white woman, mestizo, grimelle or brunette, will necessarily win in front of the “black” who has false hair and false clarity of the skin. No, but seriously, a dark, obscure, gloomy and gloomy black, who discolors her skin, and who also wears a tired blond weave, this one is counting on what to please whom? So don't be surprised that men will prefer to date a real blonde rather than her caricature. If you don't have what you want (fair skin, long hair), isn't it better to bet on what you have and what others envy you?

Beauty is not just about the clarity of the skin, otherwise black men would have the motto: “To each his albino!” So instead of making the pale and poor copies of these women who only exist in magazines that stupefy you, you black women will gain by accepting yourself as you are, that is to say by enhancing your morphological strengths without altering your original identity. A color of the face that contrasts with that of the hands, there is nothing uglier to look at!

We, black men, also have a part of the responsibility in this show since somewhere; it is to please us that these women go to such excess. The truth is that we are more to give pride of place to the paradigms of European beauty and its avatars, rather than also appreciating, and at their true value, what comes from here. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. By looking at dark-skinned women differently, perhaps we will thus help to limit the excesses of the cult of clarity, and to push back the prejudices which weigh on the Negro identity which do not forget it, is what we have in common with these women.


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Jo
Jolof
September 01
Dear sisters, you are better than this. Embrace the person you are, really!

Pr
Proud Black Man
August 12
I am disgusted when I see our Black sisters torturing themselves just to look white. It's shameful and diminishing. Ladies, please, embrace yourself. You are better then that.

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